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#WMSea

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#WMSea

We’ve partnered with SeaTrees to help restore some of the most biodiverse ecosystems in the world.

About half of the world’s coral reefs have been lost in the last 30 years, and more than 60% of the remaining reefs are threatened by human activity, with Indonesia being the largest area of vulnerability.

Known as the “rainforests of the sea,” coral reefs are the largest living structures on earth and support 25% of marine life.

With SeaTrees we're helping restore the coral reef off the coast of the Ped region of Nusa Penida in Indonesia from now through World Oceans Day in June 2021.

Over a six-month period and 2,000 square meters of ocean floor, we’ll be planting 5,600 baby coral.

The conservation of these ecosystems is vital to coastal protection, scientific research, medication, fishing, eco-tourism, and more.

Our coral will provide a habitat for more than 500 species of fish, many of which are currently considered vulnerable to extinction, as well as creating 20 jobs for local villagers, supporting 12 families.

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We’ve partnered with SeaTrees to help restore some of the most biodiverse ecosystems in the world.

About half of the world’s coral reefs have been lost in the last 30 years, and more than 60% of the remaining reefs are threatened by human activity, with Indonesia being the largest area of vulnerability.

Known as the “rainforests of the sea,” coral reefs are the largest living structures on earth and support 25% of marine life.

With SeaTrees we're helping restore the coral reef off the coast of the Ped region of Nusa Penida in Indonesia from now through World Oceans Day in June 2021.

Over a six-month period and 2,000 square meters of ocean floor, we’ll be planting 5,600 baby coral.

The conservation of these ecosystems is vital to coastal protection, scientific research, medication, fishing, eco-tourism, and more.

Our coral will provide a habitat for more than 500 species of fish, many of which are currently considered vulnerable to extinction, as well as creating 20 jobs for local villagers, supporting 12 families.

Step 1

We worked with SeaTrees and their local restoration partner, Ocean Gardener, to establish the team that will harvest and cultivate our coral at The Ped Acroporia Coral Nursery.

Ocean Gardener, a local Indonesian non-profit organization, has 20 years of hands-on experience farming coral species that are key to restoration and biodiversifying efforts. Their team of marine biologists, divers, coral farmers, and educators provide Indonesian coastal communities with knowledge about their reefs.

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More people live close to reefs in Indonesia than anywhere else in the world.

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As is customary in Bali, the project received
a blessing from the local Pura Dalem Ped temple.

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Step 2

In the shallow waters of the nursery, the team carefully transplanted our coral fragments onto rope lines.

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The Ped Acroporia Coral Nursery
This nursery site, located just off the coast of Nusa Penida, is where the team will grow, monitor, and care for our coral fragments.

This process ensures that our coral
will grow to be appropriately spaced
and that the ecosystem will thrive.

The ropes are made of natural material,
so transplanting our coral causes
no harm to the ocean.

Over several months,
our coral fragments
will grow and bond
to the rope lines.

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animated bubbles
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Rope Lines
The rope lines are made of natural fibers, so they won’t pollute the ocean or damage any sea creature’s habitat.
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Coral Species
Once our Acropora coral has been harvested from the nursery, additional coral species will be brought in from other nurseries in Bali and introduced to the restoration site to increase diversity.
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Biodiversity
The coral reefs of Nusa Penida are home to 296 species of coral and 576 species of fish.

Step 2

In the shallow waters of the nursery, the team carefully transplanted our coral fragments onto rope lines.

+
The Ped Acroporia Coral Nursery
This nursery site, located just off the coast of Nusa Penida, is where the team will grow, monitor, and care for our coral fragments.

This process ensures that our coral
will grow to be appropriately spaced
and that the ecosystem will thrive.

The ropes are made of natural material,
so transplanting our coral causes
no harm to the ocean.

Over several months,
our coral fragments
will grow and bond
to the rope lines.

Down Arrow
scuba divers animated bubbles
+
Rope Lines
The rope lines are made of natural fibers, so they won’t pollute the ocean or damage any sea creature’s habitat.
+
Coral Species
Once our Acropora coral has been harvested from the nursery, additional coral species will be brought in from other nurseries in Bali and introduced to the restoration site to increase diversity.

Step 3

After four or five months of monitoring and cleaning our coral as it grows, a snorkeling team will transport our coral to its new home, slowly dropping it to the restoration site on the ocean floor and securing it in place.

Step 4

Over the next two years, the team will carefully monitor and record our coral as they grow into a thriving ecosystem.

diver
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Dives
To document our coral’s progress, the SeaTrees team will complete four dives in the course of two years.
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Footage
Underwater cameras will be used by the team to measure and keep a record of our coral’s development.
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Footage
Underwater cameras will be used by the team to measure and keep a record of our coral’s development.
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Biodiversity
The coral reefs of Nusa Penida are home to 296 species of coral and 576 species of fish.